Transition Projects

 

Housing and Homelessness — A Snapshot

On a single night in the U.S., 549,928 people experienced homelessness (January 2016)

Of those people, on any given night:

  • 32% were unsheltered, 68% were sheltered in emergency shelters or transitional housing
  • 65% were individuals (7% unaccompanied youth), 35% were families with children
  • 7.2% were veterans experiencing homelessness
  • 14% were experiencing chronic homelessness*
  • 60.1% were men, 39.6% were women, 0.3% were transgender
  • 48% were white, 39% were African American, 22% were Hispanic1

On a single night in Oregon, 13,238 people experienced homelessness (January 2016)

Of those people, on any given night:

  • 60.5% were unsheltered, 39.6% were sheltered in emergency shelters or transitional housing
  • 70.8% were individuals (8.8% were unaccompanied youth), 29.1% were families with children
  • 10.1% were veterans experiencing homelessness
  • 23.2% were experiencing chronic homelessness1

Did you know?

  • Oregon has the 5th highest rate of per capita homelessness in the U.S.
  • Oregon has the 2nd highest rate of unsheltered homeless in the U.S.
  • Oregon has the highest percentage of unsheltered homeless families with children in the U.S.
  • Oregon has one of the highest rates of unsheltered veterans in the U.S. (55% unsheltered)2

On a single night in Portland/Multnomah County, 3,800 people experienced homelessness (January 2015)

Of those people, on any given night:

  • 49% were unsheltered, 51% were sheltered in emergency shelters or transitional housing
  • 83% were individuals (6% were unaccompanied youth), 17% were families with children
  • 11% were veterans experiencing homelessness
  • 33% had been homeless for more than 6 months, 27% had been homeless for more than 2 years2

What does it mean to say Portland has an “Affordable Housing Crisis”?

  • In 2016, Portland had the highest rent increases in the U.S., with rent prices rising 14% between February and March alone3
  • The average monthly cost of a 1 bedroom apartment in Portland is $1,500 per month4
  • On a minimum wage salary, a Portlander makes $9.25 per hour and approx. $1,480 per month5
  • In 2015, 15.4% of Oregonians (600,000 people, roughly equal to the population of Portland), had incomes below the poverty line6
  • More than half of tenants in Portland are "rent-burdened," meaning they spend more than 30 percent of their income on rent7
  • As of 2016, there is a shortage of 25,000 affordable housing units in Multnomah County8

And, less and less funding is going toward creating affordable housing…

What progress has been made?

  • The U.S. government is currently focusing on veteran and chronic homelessness. Chronic homelessness has been reduced by 27% from 2010-2016. Veteran homelessness has fallen by nearly 50 percent since 2010.
  • The number of overall homeless declined by 3% in 2016, and by 12.6% from 2009-20161
  • In October 2015, the Portland City Council declared a state of emergency around Portland’s affordable housing crisis. That year-long state of emergency was renewed in the fall of 2016.
  • While the overall number of people experiencing homelessness is decreasing slightly, the number of chronically homeless and unsheltered homeless is increasing along the West Coast and within the Portland area.2

*Chronic homelessness: Refers to an individual with a disability who has been continuously homeless for 1 year or more or has experienced at least four episodes of homelessness in the last 3 years where the combined length of time homeless in those occasions is at least 12 months.

  1. The 2016 Annual Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR) to Congress, The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development
  2. 2015 Point-in-Time Count of Homelessness in Portland/Gresham/Multnomah County, Oregon, June 2015
  3. National Apartment Report: March 2016, Abodo
  4. Rent Trend Data in Portland, OR, Rent Jungle
  5. Oregon Minimum Wage Rate Summary, Oregon.gov
  6. Self-Sufficiency and the Minimum Wage in Oregon, Raise Effect
  7. Rents rose 13 percent annually, new but supply slowed price growth, The Oregonian
  8. Portland Needs to Build Thousands of Affordable Apartments. Here's Why It Keeps Coming Up Short., Willamette Week
 

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